Shades of Gray

CHEONG: Let’s Look at Classic Fairy Tales Through the Lens of Social Justice

The illiberal left is incapable of getting its priorities in order. As Hollywood burns with allegations of pedophilia and widespread sexual assault, 21st century pearl-clutchers have instead set their sights on classic fairy tales.

The people we see on television are rarely the heroes they portray, and their private lives more closely resemble those of the villains. Yet instead of taking aim at these real-world monsters, an outspoken woman by the name of Sarah Hall made the headlines recently in her call for libraries to ban Sleeping Beauty.

In light of the #MeToo movement, in which women came forward with lurid allegations against the men who abused them, Hall decided that she, too, was very much affected by the unfolding drama after she read the classic fairy tale to her six-year-old .

In a series of tweets that have since gone viral and has become the hottest take of recent weeks, Hall called Sleeping Beauty a problematic lesson for children—teaching them that it’s okay for them to kiss a woman without her consent.

Showing no confidence in her own son Ben’s ability to tell right from wrong, the 40-year-old mother from Hull, U.K. left a comment in her son’s record book, and contacted his school to demand the book be removed from circulation.

She said: “In today’s society, it isn’t appropriate – my son is only six, he absorbs everything he sees, and it isn’t as if I can turn it into a constructive conversation.”

“I don’t think taking Sleeping Beauty books out of circulation completely would be right. I actually think it would be a great resource for older children, you could have a conversation around it, you could talk about consent, and how the Princess might feel,” she added. “But I’m really concerned about it for younger children, would really welcome a conversation about whether this is suitable material.”

Given that the story revolves around a princess doomed to sleep forever, being kissed to wake up would be a blessing.

It would be ill-advised to perform any sexual act on someone in a coma, unless you want them to take revenge on you—just like in Kill Bill, which was incidentally produced by Harvey Weinstein, ironically enough.

Like Kill Bill, Sleeping Beauty is fictional, and there’s no way anyone in their right mind would take it as a suggestion for them to commit sexual assault, excluding woke moralists.

Given the virality of Hall’s complaints and the propensity for social justice warriors to find new things to whine about, Sleeping Beauty may only be the tip of the social justice iceberg in a new wave of attacks on classic fairy tales.

Here are a few fairy tales, both classic and modern, social justice warriors should find offensive.

Goldilocks, white privilege

The protagonist in Goldilocks is clearly a product of white privilege, able to walk into the home of three otherwise wild bears and consume all of their food while destroying their beds. If she were a black man, they would’ve shot her on sight and gotten away with it thanks to the castle doctrine. The bears live in Texas.

The Little Mermaid, miscegenation and conservative relationships

The Little Mermaid warns against the dangers of race-mixing. A mermaid by birth, Ariel seeks to romance the prince (thus also promoting traditional, and un-progressive concepts of monogamous, heterosexual relationships) outside her species and ends up paying the ultimate price upon his rejection of her love. The prince denies Ariel by marrying a human woman, essentially condemning Ariel to death instead of engaging in polyamory. Cruel.

Snow White, misogyny and ableism

Racist tropes about the fairness of Snow White’s skin aside, the fairy tale promotes traditional gender roles right off the bat, and depicts the only woman with agency as an evil queen whose only quality is jealousy. When Snow White arrives at the home of the seven dwarves, they immediately put her to work as their maid as they go off to work in the mines.

The dwarves themselves are depicted as squat, unattractive men with psychiatric problems. The dwarves offer no sexual qualities to Snow White, who seeks a straight white Chad to sweep in and rescue her from the humdrum of living with seven men defined by their mental illnesses—Sleepy suffers from narcolepsy, Bashful has social anxiety disorder, Grumpy struggles with depression, and so forth. Their diminutive stature and mental illnesses make them poor candidates for romance, at least in the eyes of its authors.

Cinderella, body shaming and gender roles

While men get to be princes and nobles, the women in Cinderella are forced into subservient roles. The titular character performs housework while her sisters, who would normally share her duties, lobby for the prince’s attention. She gains the prince’s attention for a single night, and departs, leaving only a glass slipper behind.

More interested in her body and not in her mind, the prince seeks out Cinderella through the glass slipper alone, as women line up to fit themselves into it. Cinderella’s two step-sisters mutilate their feet, which is something the beauty industry encourages women to do to feel beautiful.

 

Ian Miles Cheong is an outspoken journalist and writer for DANGEROUS. He has contributed to the Daily CallerThe Sun, and Heat Street. Follow him on Twitter or Facebook.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Steve O

    December 5, 2017 at 2:57 pm

    “a problematic lesson for children—teaching them that it’s okay for them to kiss a woman without her consent.”

    — I guess she missed the part about true love. There is not a toddler in the world who thinks of that kiss as a “sexual” act. But yeah, leave it for the older kids. I’m sure the teenagers would love the story.

  2. Bookish1

    December 8, 2017 at 10:22 am

    I believe that the original version of “Sleeping Beauty” has her being awakened with a bit more than a kiss. It should be noted, however, that most of these “fairy tales” were actually meant for adults.

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